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PhD Studentship 

Phenotype variability in congenital myopathies

Applications are invited for a 4-year PhD studentship at the School of Basic and Medical Biosciences (King’s College London, UK).

 

The Project 

The successful candidate will work on a research project aiming to use CRISPR to develop in vivo models to reveal molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying two muscle diseases: Myosin Storage Myopathy and Laing Distal Myopathy. This is a pluridisciplinary project between two laboratories (led by Dr. Julien Ochala and Prof. Simon Hughes) where the successful candidate will receive a unique training combining molecular biology, zebrafish genetics, cell physiology and biophysics. The preferred start date is October 2017 and the duration is 4 years.

 

Funding 

The PhD studentship is sponsored by the Muscular Dystrophy UK (www.musculardystrophyuk.org). It will last 4 years, will cover the full university fees at UK/EU level and will provide a stipend at the current Research Council rate. 

 

Eligibility 

The studentship is only available to UK/EU nationals. To apply, you must have a first or upper second class degree in Molecular Biology, Biochemistry or Genetics. You should be interested in Muscle Biology. You should possess excellent written and oral communication skills. You should be highly motivated and able to work as part of a team.

 

Applications 

All applicants must complete and submit by email to the first supervisor (Dr. Julien Ochala) the following documentation in PDF format: CV, statement (giving details of the reasons for applying), and names, contact details of 2 referees. 

Please note that as part of selection, short-listed candidates will be invited for interview ASAP, and candidates should explicitly indicate if there are dates they cannot be available.

 

Application Closing Date 

Open until suitable candidate is found.

 

Enquiries 

For further information: Informal enquiries and requests for further information may be directed to Dr. Julien Ochala julien.ochala@kcl.ac.uk

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